AUTISTIC NICK’S SHORT BREAK

AUTISTIC NICK’S SHORT BREAK

Holidays or short weekend breaks are at present not possible as where I live in Western Australia our boarders to other countries are currently closed.

We cannot pack our suitcases and jump on a plane and fly to another country to lie on a sun lounger to soak up the sun and order drinks from passing waiters/waitress.

Given these circumstances I have decided to have a short break down in the town of Fremantle.

FREMANTLE

Fremantle is the most eclectic and spirited seaside destination in the world. Fremantle or ‘Freo’ is Perth’s Old Town. It’s a maritime city with spirit and soul, full of vibrancy, colour and culture.

Meet local characters who will lead you on adventures through historic streets, hidden laneways, and salty ports on your way to Rottnest Island.

It’s an adventure not found elsewhere in Australia; swim at a beach in the middle of the city and have a cocktail brought right to your sun lounge: then weave your way through boutique shops, small bars, and street art in the middle of one of Australia’s largest heritage listed precincts.

But when we get there what is there to do?

FREMANTLE AT NIGHT
AERIAL VIEW OF FREMANTLE

The 10 Absolute Best Things to Do in Fremantle

Fremantle Prison.

WA Maritime Museum / Shipwreck Gallery.

Little Creatures Brewery.

Fremantle Markets.

Street Art and Bon Scott statue.

Fremantle Round House.

Fremantle tram tour.

Fremantle Arts Centre.

This will be my first visit here and in advance of my trip I am preparing to make a list of items that I can have to hand in case of a sensory overload.

Fremantle, Western Australia – Aug 6th 2019: The landmark Fremantle Markets is a public market selling food and fashion. The building was built in 1897.
FREMANTLE ART

SENSORY OVERLOAD BAG: 

Possible contents – sunglasses, ear plugs, noise cancelling headphones, squeeze ball, aromatherapy lotion and anything that might help avert sensory overload.

A SAFE WORD

If it all becomes too much, agree beforehand on a safe code word you can use to alert the person you are with that it’s all becoming too much and that you need to step away to a quiet place/room

FOOD AND WATER:

Planning your food and water requirements is essential to the art of survival. Make sure that your favourite snacks are pre-packed before you head out, and that your favourite water bottle is filled up.

NOTEBOOKS:

A notebook is a handy object to carry so I can sit outside in the sun light, write, compose my blogs and keep a journal. I will also be taking a book and a puzzle book as well as my I-pad which has solitaire on it.

NOISE CANCELLING HEADPHONES:

What a gift from the quiet police! Without noise cancelling headphones I wouldn’t be able to survive.

AN EMERGENCY NOTE OR AUTISM AWARENESS CARD:

If it all become too much and you find yourself going into panic, have this note prepared (if you are on your own):

“Hi, my name’s BLANK.
I have Autism, and I find it hard to speak sometimes.
Please call my mum on the following number: “

I have what is known as an Autism Alert card which I carry with me everywhere I go; it sits inside my wallet.

The Autism Alert Card is free, plastic and credit card sized and may be carried by an Autistic individual to identify that they are on the Autistic spectrum.

The purpose of the card is designed to aid those with Autism communicate that they are Autistic more effectively.

The card is for autistic people to show others if they are upset or likely to become upset. The person shown the card should then change the way they talk to the autistic individual.

The aim of showing the card is to defuse the potentially difficult situation and allow the autistic individual to feel safe and secure so they may become less agitated and anxious, and the situation dealt with in the best way for all involved.

For more information and to order a card please click on this link

https://www.autismspectrum.org.au/alert-card

A WEIGHTED LAP BLANKET:

Basically, the weighted lap blanket releases things inside of your body that send calming signals to my brain if you have the jitters or are squirming and moving and can’t sit still and concentrate properly.

I was also prepared in advance as I was sent the details of the hotel where we are staying so I could see pictures of what it’s like and what facilities they have to offer.

I have also looked at the Fremantle website to see what’s on when I am down there.

You can visit the website by clicking the link here

https://www.visitfremantle.com.au/

I’m looking forward to heading away for a few days of rest and relaxation.

Carry on the Conversation

Do you have any travel tips you would like to pass on?

Are you going on holiday anywhere this year?

Let me know in the comments section below.

As always, I can also be found on Twitter:@AutisticNickAU and on the Autistic Nick Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/AutisticNickAU/

Thank you for reading and I will see you next time for more thoughts from across the spectrum.

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